Camborne Mining District

The Camborne Mining District, this is the first page covering “The Camborne and Redruth Mining District”. So, I have decided to split this area into two pages, because of the large number of mines and remains of industry to be found there.

This area of Cornwall is often regarded as the capital of Cornwall’s Mining Districts. Not only did it contain many important mines, but also many of the services that supported the Cornish Industry were based there. Such as: Holman’s Rock Drills, Rope Works, Camborne School of Mines and Bickford’s Safety Fuse Factory.

South Crofty, the last working mine in Cornwall closed here in 1998, along with many notable and profitable mines. Dolcoath Mine, (The Queen of Cornish Mines) alone produced a massive 350,000 tons of Copper and 80,000 tons of Tin. So sad that for such an important mine there is very little left to see now on the surface. The passages and stopes deep underground are now dark and silent.

The next page will cover the “Redruth Mining District” thus partnering this page “The Camborne Mining District”, combined they produce The Central Mining District.
There will be frequent additions to this page as I reprint more material.

Camborne Mining District

Camborne Mining District 1: This first image is looking across part of the “Central Mining District”. In the foreground Dolcoath Mine, to the right Cooks Kitchen to the left South Crofty Mine. This image dates to 1999.

Camborne Mining District

Camborne Mining District 2: This image is looking across Dolcoath Mine site. In the background is New East Shaft Engine House, and the headframes of the then working South Crofty Mine.

Camborne Mining District

Camborne Mining District 3: Carn Brea Mine the remains of the Stamps Engine House. This was the home to a 32″ engine, the house was constructed in 1837 making it one of the oldest survivors in Cornwall, the engine had an impressive long life operating until 1913. The mine worked from 1833-1920 producing a total 237,493 tons Copper, 29,600 tons Tin and 4,140 tons of Arsenic.

Camborne Mining District

Camborne Mining District 4: Another image of the engine house, in the background can be seen the South Crofty site. This was taken in 1995 when the mine was still working.

Camborne Mining District

Camborne Mining District 5: Cook’s Kitchen Mine, this site is adjacent to South Crofty and worked from 1815-1905 producing a total of: 40,920 tons Copper,8,859 Tons tin and 120 tons of Arsenic.

Camborne Mining District

Camborne Mining District 6: The 55″ pumping engine house on Chapple’s Shaft certainly long before renovation. In the background is the South Crofty Site.

For more images follow this link: Cook’s Kitchen Mine Gallery

Camborne Mining District

Camborne Mining District 7: The impressive Engine House on Neame’s Shaft Great Condurrow Mine.

Camborne Mining District

Camborne Mining District 8: Another image of the Engine House, this mine worked from 1860-1913 producing 30,495 tons Copper and 2,030 tons of Tin.

Camborne Mining District

Camborne Mining District 9: Looking towards the shaft, in the foreground are the loadings for the Whim (Winding) Engine.

Camborne Mining District

Camborne Mining District 10: Vivian’s Shaft Great Condurrow Mine, this is on the site of the King Edward Mine Museum.

Camborne Mining District

Camborne Mining District 11: A second image of the headframe showing the buildings around it.

For more images follow this link: King Edward Mine Museum

Camborne Mining District

Camborne Mining District 12: The engine house on New East Shaft of Dolcoath Mine.

For more images follow this link: Dolcoath Mine Gallery

Camborne Mining District

Camborne Mining District 13: This is the impressive preserved drum of the winder at Harriet’s Shaft of Dolcoath Mine.

For more images follow this link: Dolcoath Mine Winder

Camborne Mining District

Camborne Mining District 14: This image is of the preserved 90″ Pumping Engine on Taylor’s Shaft of East Pool and Agar Mine. Also, it is open to the public, consequently preserving the mining heritage of the area.

Camborne Mining District

Camborne Mining District 15: Michell’s Shaft of East Pool and Agar is situated between Camborne and Redruth, this is the flywheel of the preserved Winding Engine. These are the remains of two mines which merged in 1897, it is the home to a preserved 30″ Rotative Beam Engine that is open to the public. In total the mines worked from 1835-1945, East Pool produced 88,3000 tons Copper, 38,490 tons Tin, 31,722 tons Arsenic and 2,820 tons of Wolfram. Wheal Agar produced 3,033 tons of Copper.

Follow this link to see more images in the East Pool and Agar Gallery

A link to the National Trust Website: East Pool and Agar Information

Camborne Mining District

Camborne Mining District 16: The last Mine to work, an image of South Crofty soon after closure. The headframe over New Cooks Shaft which was 769m deep.

For more images of South Crofty Mine follow this link: South Crofty Mine Surface

Camborne Mining District

Camborne Mining District 17: The South Crofty site in 2016, plans are now (2017) well under the way to open up the old bal again.

For more images of South Crofty Mine follow this link: South Crofty Mine Surface 2016

Camborne Mining District

Camborne Mining District 18: Robinson’s Shaft South Crofty Mine taken in 1998.

For more images of South Crofty Mine Robinson’s Shaft follow this link:
South Crofty Mine Robinson’s Shaft

Camborne Mining District

Camborne Mining District 19: The headframe over Roskear Shaft South Crofty Mine taken in 1997.

For more images of South Crofty Mine Roskear Shaft follow this link:
South Crofty Mine Roskear Shaft

Camborne Mining District

Camborne Mining District 20: An image looking down New Cook’s Kitchen Shaft of South Crofty Mine.

Camborne Mining District

Camborne Mining District 21: Certainly a breed of men apart. Miners in South Crofty Mine before it closed, loading wagons with ore using an Eimco Rocker Shovel.

For more images of South Crofty Mine Underground follow this link:
South Crofty Mine Underground

Camborne Mining District

Camborne Mining District 22: The Stray Park Mine 60″ Pumping Engine House, the mine was sold to Dolcoath in 1870 for £2,000. However, the mine was never rich. As a result Dolcoath attempted to sell the property again in 1888 with no success.

Camborne Mining District

Camborne Mining District 23: Tincroft Mines Compressor house, this building dates from 1891. The mine worked from 1815-1921 producing 112,700 tons Copper, 32,970 ton Tin, and 6,530 ton Arsenic.

Camborne Mining District

Camborne Mining District 24: The Man Engine House and Compressor House of Tincroft Mine.

For more images follow this link: Tincroft Mine Gallery

Camborne Mining District

Camborne Mining District 25: The New Stamps Engine House of Wheal Grenville. This is the foundation for the flywheel that drove 136 heads of stamps. In the distance are the two engine houses on Fortescue’s shaft. Probably one of my favorite images on this page.

For more images follow this link: Wheal Grenville Mine Gallery

Camborne Mining District

Camborne Mining District 26: South Wheal Frances Mine, this is the Engine House on Daubuz Shaft. The building housed a 30″ Rotative Beam engine that both wound and pumped.

Camborne Mining District

Camborne Mining District 27: The shaft reached a final depth of 230 fathoms, the access here was primarily for the Great Flat Lode. The engine worked until 1918. The chimney here is unusual at it has a very large diameter at the base, over 4 metres.

Camborne Mining District 28

Camborne Mining District 28: Built in 1869 this is Bailey’s 24″ Whim Engine House, of West Wheal Frances Mine. The mine worked from 1848 to 1896 when the low price of Tin finally caused closure. During this period the mine produced over 9,000 tons of Tin.

Camborne Mining District

Camborne Mining District 29: This was “Smith’s” Shaft, it reached a final depth of 174 fathoms. The engine house was once used as a water tank, so the windows and doors were blocked up.

Camborne Mining District

Camborne Mining District 30: The area had many Tin Streaming plants, this image is looking across the remains of slime tables where Tin was recovered from mine water. Also, in the background is the headframe on New Cooks Kitchen Shaft South Crofty Mine.

Camborne Mining District

Camborne Mining Districts 31: Ruined warehouses on the Bickford’s Fuse Works Site. The headframe and processing sheds of South Crofty Mine can be seen in the background. As a result of the concentration of mines of the support industry was based in the local area.

For more images of Bickford’s Fuse works follow this link: Bickford’s Fuse Works

Camborne Mining District

Camborne Mining Districts 32: The sad remains of the offices of Bennett’s Fuse works at Roskear. The building dates from around 1870, sadly in the last few years it has suffered from vandalism and fires.

Camborne Mining District

Camborne Mining Districts 33: The chimney of Roseworthy Arsenic stack, a prominent landmark on the A30. The English Arsenic Company were based here between 1897 and 1926.

Camborne Mining District

Camborne Mining Districts 34: The surviving condensing chambers at Roseworthy, because these are dangerous they should not be entered.

Camborne Mining District

Camborne.Mining Districts 35: This image taken in Tuckingmill Valley shows one of the Arsenic Mills, the chimney in the background belongs to another Arsenic works.

Camborne Mining District

Camborne.Mining Districts 36: Finally, on this page taken in 1999, the Tolvaddon Valley. Here was the site of various Tin Streaming works also the processing floors of East Pool Mine.

Redruth Mining District

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