Cligga Head Mine

The images below were taken at Cligga Head Wolframite Mine in the late 1990’s. Wolframite was the main source of Tungsten which was widely used in the manufacture of munitions.
The surface area of the site was the location for the British and Colonial Explosives factory which opened in 1893. This was eventually purchased by the Nobel Explosive Company, the site was in production until 1909 when a drop in metal prices closed many of the neighbouring mines.
The Cligga Head Mine opened in 1938 and was closed on the completion of the Second World War in 1945. In the 1960’s Geevor Mine in collaboration with other mining companies, re-commenced underground works with active exploration and diamond drilling. No great results were forthcoming and in 1964 Geevor Mine decided to expand their own sett with the re-entry of the Levant Mine workings, so the site was again abandoned.
More work on the site was planned for the 1980’s, however the huge drop in the price of Tin due to the market collapse halted this project. The story here is not over yet, with rising Tin prices I believe there has been renewed interest in the site, the future, who knows.
These images were taken in the late 1990’s.

Cligga Head Mine

The cap over Contact Shaft, this was the main hoisting shaft of the mine.

Cligga Head Mine

One of the big settling tanks at Cligga Head.

Cligga Head Mine

A second image of the tank.

Cligga Head Mine

The remains of the mill are extensive, with many concrete foundations.

Cligga Head Mine

In the foreground is a buddle used to concentrate the ore, behind are the impressive mill remains.

Cligga Head Mine

A closer view of the mill remains.

Cligga Head Mine

Old brickwork and foundations on the site.

Cligga Head Mine

Looking across the base of the winder house at Cligga Head Mine.

Cligga Head Mine

Part of the Explosive Works at the site.

Consols and United Mines Gallery

Contact