Mount Wellington Mine: Home

Mount Wellington Mine was originally part of the United Mines, a major Copper producer which closed in the 1880’s.

In the early 20th Century the site was worked on a small scale as Magpie Mine by three brothers named Wellington. As a result of a collapse of ground in the shaft they were using, the site was abandoned. In the 1930’s a company called Argus Concessions Ltd obtained the lease. After a large amount of underground development the mine once again closed in 1939, because the ores were complex proving difficult to process, along with the low price of Tin at the time proved fatal.

Mount Wellington Mine

Mount Wellington Mine.1 – A cross section of the modern mine.
Reproduced here with permission of Richard Freeborn.

In the late 1960’s diamond drilling on the site was commenced, favourable results were found.  Subsequently in 1969 planning permission was granted to Cornwall Tin and Mining Company Ltd to erect building and commence shaft sinking with began in September of that year. However lack of funds in 1973 caused a halt to mining preparations. Further investment was found, the shaft was deepened and the mill construction was due to be completed and operational by January 1976.

Mount Wellington Mine

Mount Wellington Mine.2 – A group of miners outside the shaft cage waiting to go underground. 
Reproduced here with permission of Richard Freeborn.

Mount Wellington Mine

Mount Wellington Mine.3 – The electric winder at Mount Wellington Mine being installed.
This is published here with permission of Paul Chesterfield.

The modern Mount Wellington Mine worked from 1976 to April 1978. Closure was due to a variety of reasons, because the mine was very wet pumping over 5,000 gallons per minute. Also, the mill output was not what the company had hoped for, labour problems and management errors also added to the issues.

After closure the mine continued to pump for a short while, due to it being connected underground with Wheal Jane Mine across the valley. The two enterprises worked in unison to keep the tunnels free from water. While the mill worked until May 1981 processing parcels of South Crofty ore and waste from the Carnon Valley.

Mount Wellington Mine

Mount Wellington Mine.4 – The headframe over No1 Shaft.

Mount Wellington Mine

Mount Wellington Mine.5 – The sheave wheels from the top of the headframe are now mounted at the entrance to the site.
Reproduced here with permission of Richard Freeborn.

I first visited Mount Wellington Mine in 1992 and was amazed at the survival. Sadly over the years the buildings were gutted and smashed. Subsequently in 2007 the headframe was removed which was sad, there are so few left in Cornwall now.

Mount Wellington Mine

Mount Wellington Mine.6 – The rear of the processing mill with the conveyor feed from the shaft on the left of the image.

The site has been taken over in January 2007 by Richard Freeborn of Kensa Engineering Ltd a manufacturer of ground source heat pumps.The area has retained many of its features which is also good news.
Follow this link to see their: Website

Mount Wellington Mine

Mount Wellington Mine.7 – An areial view of the site as it is today.
Reproduced here with permission of Richard Freeborn.

When the site was being cleared I managed to salvage a couple of documents from a skip. Seems like they are weekly equipment check reports.

Mount Wellington Mine

Mount Wellington Mines.8

Mount Wellington Mine

Mount Wellington Mines.9

New Mine Gallery 1

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