Roskear Shaft Site: 2

Roskear Shaft Site 2, so, this is the second page which looks at this remarkable historical survival. Sadly the site is on the verge of total collapse. The Compressor House is unique as it contains many original features dating from when Roskear Shaft was first constructed.

Roskear Shaft

These are the rear walls of the Winder House (L) and the Compressor House (R).  These date from the 1920’s when New Dolcoath acquired the Roskear Shaft site.

The building belonging to the Roskear Shaft site are in a varied state of repair. The area has seen several major fires which destroyed part of the site formally used as offices.

Roskear Shaft

A closer look at the rear wall of the Compressor House, the circular window is framed by dressed stone. In many places the mortar has suffered badly.

Roskear Shaft

A view of the side wall. The ivy and vegetation have taken their toll on the stonework. Original brackets are still attached to the rear wall. Everything about the building is ornate and attractive to look at.

The rear wall of the Compressor House was all blocked off. However access was possible through a side entrance which has since been secured. The interior was amazingly well preserved, a time machine at Roskear Shaft.

Roskear Shaft

This is the doorway that led from the Compressor House to the Winder House at Roskear Shaft. Mounting for the machinery took up most of the floor area. Because of the current state of the building it is unwise to enter.

Roskear Shaft

Huge iron pipes still remained in place in the Compressor House.

Roskear Shaft

The roof is in wonderful condition. I would guess it was re-roofed at some point. This is looking towards the rear of the building.

Roskear Shaft

The mounting blocks for the machinery were about 6ft above the level of the floor. The steps in the image would allow access to maintain the machinery when it was in use.

Roskear Shaft

The mounting blocks for the Compressor. Around the outside wall of the building were original floorboards. Sadly they were rotten and not for walking on.

Roskear Shaft

It was very interesting that on the outside of the Compressor House there was this suspended pipe. It actually led to the building next door.

Roskear Shaft

A side view of the Compressor House at Roskear Shaft. The iron pipe can be seen leading from the building. The chimney for the boilers which powered the site is on the left of the image. Very sad that the roof had suffered.

Roskear Shaft

A final view of he Compressor House, in the foreground are the remains of the offices.

The next set of images are of he ruined offices. These were initially used by Bennett’s Fuse Works. Sadly they were the target of vandals and were burnt down in recent years. A great loss as it is a lovely building full of history.

Roskear Shaft

These are the sad remains of the Bennetts Fuse Works offices. The area on the right of the image was a coal store.

Roskear Shaft

The frontage of the building, after successive fires it is a surprise anything is still standing.

Roskear Shaft

In it’s heyday it must have been a beautiful building.

Roskear Shaft

The quality of the brickwork around the windows was an indication of the quality of the build.

Roskear Shaft

The roof has been completely destroyed and the inside is totally gutted.

Roskear Shaft

The Bennetts Fuse works was established in 1873, by 1914 the factory employed 250 workers. and grew to be a major competitor for Bickfords. At times purchasing even more gunpowder than Bickfords for use in fuse production. Bennetts were bought out by Bickfords in 1907, and the factory closed in 1923.

Roskear Shaft

I wonder what in in store for this building. In it’s present state it can only be marked for demolition. Another loss to Cornish History.

The rest of the images were taken inside the building, hard hats were worn and no risks were taken. Just because there are images here, it does not infer that this area of the Roskear Shaft site is safe to enter.

Roskear Shaft

This is the first image of the ruined interior. The floor was covered in debris from the collapsed roof and upper storey.

Roskear Shaft

Because of the fine wooden panelling on the wall this shows it was not a building to be ignored. Perhaps this part of the second floor was some sort of meeting room or a persons office.

Roskear Shaft

Whenever I see steps like this I cannot help but wonder who has walked up them. The history here was palatable and very moving. Old electric light switches were still on the walls.

Roskear Shaft

One of the original doorways had survived the fires. Handmade and very high quality timber work. Some of the sash windows still retained their lead weights.

Roskear Shaft

Dado and picture rails are still attached to the walls of the ground floor. Another indication of the quality of the original building.

Roskear Shaft

This part of the building appeared to be a small workshop.

Roskear Shaft

This final image of the collapsed floor beams really shows how far the building has deteriorated.

South Crofty Mine Roskear 2

A small building on the other side of the Roskear Shaft site had also been damaged by fire. Sadly so much of the place was beyond repair.

Roskear Shaft

So, I would imagine an awful lot of thinking went on in this little room.

Because of the perilous state of the Roskear Site I must reiterate that the buildings are dangerous and unstable. Because of this they should not be entered.

South Polgooth Mine

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