South Crofty Mine Roskear Shaft Underground

I was lucky enough on my visits to South Crofty to get to see Roskear Shaft underground on three occasions. Once a camera packed up, another where I had no time to hang around. On the third occasion I had around 30 minutes to myself, which was time for an explore and a few images to be taken. It was a very interesting area, the shaft was breath taking with living history all around. It’s so difficult to believe it is all underwater now.

Roskear Shaft

South Crofty Mine Roskear Shaft Underground, the sinking of Roskear Shaft was begun by the Dolcoath Company in 1923. After the closure of Dolcoath Mine in 1921, this was planned to be the focus of the New Dolcoath Mine. The circular, brick-lined, shaft was sunk by shaft sinkers from South Wales and eventually reached 2000 feet deep by late 1926. Levels at 1700, 1900 and 2000 feet intersected a number of lodes and some limited stoping was done on the Roskear Complex for wolfram and tin.

Roskear Shaft

The gated entrance to the New Roskear Shaft Station area, the shaft indicator is hanging from the roof.

Roskear Shaft

The 2000ft Station on New Roskear Shaft South Crofty, the brick arches to the shaft can be clearly seen. Photography here was interesting as there was a gale blowing from the ventilation fans on the surface. The chains support a bridge over the shaft.

Roskear Shaft

A wider view of the 2000ft Shaft Station, on the left of the image is the bay for the pumping engine.

Roskear Shaft

A second image of the shaft station, to the left of the image are the remains of a small pumping engine which dates from the 1920’s.

Roskear Shaft

A view of the pumping engine , the pipe infront was attached to the rising main.

Roskear Shaft

A side on view of the engine remains.

Roskear Shaft

The engine in its bay area.

Roskear Shaft

An image of the engine showing a bit more detail, its a shame that this is now all under water, lost and forgotten.

Roskear Shaft

Looking down the length of the engine bay.

Roskear Shaft

The end of the rising main which led to the shaft.

Roskear Shaft

A closer image of the fly-wheel.

Roskear Shaft

An image of the bridge across the New Roskear Shaft, this was a suspended chain and timber bridge over a deep hole…..not frightening at all.

Roskear Shaft

My guide on this occasion was James Pettett, this is an image of him crossing the shaft.

Roskear Shaft

A image looking up the shaft to surface 2000ft away, the guides for the installed cage winder can be seen. The shaft was brick lined to surface, that must have been an amazing achievement.

Roskear Shaft

The disconnected rising main running up the shaft, the quality of the brickwork was amazing.

Roskear Shaft

An image looking down the New Roskear Shaft which was 400 fathoms deep, the base of the cage guides can be seen.

Roskear Shaft

James Pettett from the Ventilation Department taking air samples in the drive leading to the shaft, this was done to monitor the Radon Levels in the mine.

Roskear Shaft

This is James removing the planks from a ventilation door in the New Roskear Shaft section.

Roskear Shaft

When the cats away the mice will play. I was on my own for a while so I explored. I crossed the shaft into the “New Dolcoath Mine” for a shufty around. The ground was not good, with false floors long rotted through, I reached a small stope and had a chance to grab this image.

Roskear Shaft

At the end of the drive the timberwork had all collapsed, the open stope was above.

Roskear Shaft

Looking back down the drive to the main haulage route, the remains of a cousin jack chute can be seen on the left of the image.

Roskear Shaft

Most of the timber had collapsed in this section.

Roskear Shaft

A final image of the drive showing the extent of the very nasty timber supports.

South Crofty Mine Underground Gallery 1

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