The Penwith & St Just Mines

The St Just Mining District during the 19th was one of the major producers of Copper and Tin in Cornwall. Here Botallack and Levant Mines underground workings ventured out under the sea, some for upto a mile. The underground mineral deposits (Lodes) are concentrated at a rough right angle to the coastline. The further inland the richness decreases, at the seaward side the mineral is richer, this is why the mines are concentrated along the rugged Granite cliffs of the North Coast.

St Just Mines

Boswedden Mine at the seaward end of the Nancherrow Valley, worked from 1837-1876 producing 1,375 tons of Tin and 200 tons of Copper. The image shows the impressive dressed granite blocks that supported one of the two waterwheels used at the mine, this wheel was 52ft diameter.

St Just Mines

A second image of the waterwheel foundations framed by an old engine which used to pump water to a house on the hillside above.

St Just Mines

One of the most famous views in Cornwall, Botallack Mine “The Crowns”, this photograph was taken close to sea level for that different angle.

For more images follow this link: Botallack Mine Gallery

St Just Mines

The decorative chimney stack of Cape Cornwall Mine. Cape Cornwall and Cape Wrath are the only two Capes in Britain, both are stunning in their natural beauty

St Just Mines

The remains of the Pumping Engine House at Carn Galver Mine.

For more images follow the Link Carn Galver Mine Gallery

St Just Mines

Ding Dong Mine, Greenburrow Shaft. The mine worked from 1815-1878 producing 3,475 tons of Tin.

For more images follow the link Ding Dong Mine Gallery

St Just Mines

Perched high on the side of the cliff in Pendeen is Levant Mine, one of the great Copper and Tin producers of Cornwall.

For more images follow this link: Levant Mine Gallery

St Just Mines

Overlooking Priest Cove are the scant remains of St Just United Mine, working from 1862-1904 it produced 2,982 tons of Tin. The image is taken looking across the pumping engine shaft of the mine, in the background the chimney of Cape Cornwall mine is visible.

St Just Mines

Wheal Edward Stamps Engine House, part of the Wheal Owles mine sett. The house dates from around 1870 and contained a 28″ multi functional engine which drove a battery of stamps (used for crushing the ore) and it hoisted from two shafts, Wheal Edward incline shaft and Cargodna skip shaft (Thanks to Paul for this information).

St Just Mines

The remains of the 30″ Pumping Engine House at Wheal Owles Engine Shaft, this reached a depth of 196 Fathoms.

St Just Mines

Cargodna 36″ Pumping Engine House of Wheal Owles, the mine worked from 1821-1907 producing 8,950 tons Tin, 2,079 tons Copper, 50 tons of Arsenic and quantities of Uranium. The Cargodna Shaft halfway down the cliff face was the site of a mining disaster on 10th January 1893. Miners working in this section on the 65 fathom level accidentally breached the flooded workings of a neighbouring mine called Wheal Drea. The sound of the water flooding into the workings was described by one miner as “louder than ten thousand thunders”. Nineteen men and one boy were drowned, their bodies were never recovered, may they rest in peace.

St Just Mines

Wheal Drea Multipurpose Engine House at the top of the Kenidjack Valley. The engine here was a combined 26″ used for both Pumping and Winding. This dates from the latter part of the 1850’s, the shaft here reached a depth of 160 Fathoms.

St Just Mines

A second image of the Wheal Drea Engine House.

St Just Mines

A second image of Wheal Edward Stamps this was taken after the house was consolidated.

The Camborne Mines Gallery

Contact