The Wendron Mines

The Wendron District has a long history of mining dating from the late 1500’s and a list of over 600 mines and 9,000 inhabitants in the 1780’s.

Wendron

Part of the elevated tramway leading from “Old Men’s Shaft” of Basset & Grylls Mine to the processing mill, last worked during the 1930’s.

For more images follow the link: Basset & Grylls Mine Gallery

Wendron

The 50″ Pumping Engine House on Roger’s shaft of East Wheal Lovell, it worked from 1859-1891 producing 2,405 tons of Tin.

Wendron

The 60″ Engine House on Leeds Shaft of Great Work Mine, working from 1810-1885 it produced 6,256 tons of Tin and 1,020 tons of Copper, when the image was taken the shaft was still open.

Wendron

A second image of the Engine House showing the strapping around the walls.

Wendron

The Engine House of Prosper United Mine, it worked from 1830-1873 producing 22,500 tons of Copper, 830 tons of Tin and 1,100 Tons of Arsenic. At the time the image was taken the house was up for sale. It has since been purchased and converted into a home, lucky people.

Wendron

A second image of the Engine House at Prosper United Mine.

Wendron

The converted Engine House of Tregurtha Downs Mine is a perfect example of how to make an Engine House a home. The mine worked from 1860-1902 producing 1,295 tons of Tin, the Engine that worked here was moved to Robinson’s Shaft South Crofty Mine.

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Trewavas Head Mine along the coast from Porthleven. In my opinion this is probably the most dramatic settings for a mine in Cornwall.

For more images follow this link: Trewavas Mine Gallery

Wendron

Trumpet Consols, this is the 48″ Pumping Engine House on the Wheal Ann section. The shaft here was 142 fathoms below adit.

Wendron

Also part of Trumpet Consols this is the Whim Engine House on Dream Lode, the mines here worked from 1854-1880 producing 4,510 tons of Tin and 20 tons of Copper.

Wendron

At Rinsey Cliff along the coast from Trewavas stands the graceful 30″ Pumping Engine House of Wheal Prosper. The mine worked from 1860-1866 producing a total of 7 tons of Tin, like so many hopefully named mines this failed to make the owners rich. The site was restored by the National Trust in the 1970’s, the shaft was 462ft deep. As with most seaward mines the workings here were very dry and the engine only needed to make two strokes every three minutes. Of the second engine house which contained a stamps and whim there are no remains.

Wendron

A second image of the Wheal Prosper Engine House.

The St Ives Mines Gallery

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