Redruth Town

Redruth Town was once the mining capital of the world. Surrounded by mines it became the centre of commerce for the Cornish Mining Industry. Also the once great buildings are still there, all you have to do is walk around and look above street level. So the views are spectacular and the architecture is amazing.

Good Friday 2012, I spent a great day in the sun wandering around with the cameras around my neck. On this page I have tried to capture the marvels that remain today from the old Fire Station to the Miners Statue at the head of Fore Street.
Photography is difficult due to traffic and roads but some of the images are worthy of note.
Cornish Mine Images
Redruth Town 1 – Erected in 2008 this 2m high bronze statue of a Cornish Miner was created by artist David Annand. Holding a pick and with a string of tallow candles around his neck this is a striking piece of art. Standing at the top of Fore St, Redruth.
Cornish Mine Images
Redruth Town 2 – A second view of the statue.Also observe the fine brickwork in the building on the right of the image.
Cornish Mine Images
Redruth Town 3 – A humble Shoe Zone store, the frontage and architecture are quite stunning.
Cornish Mine Images
Redruth Town 4 – A more detailed image of the buildings frontage, No 26 Fore Street, circ 1894.
Cornish Mine Images
Redruth Town 5 – Lower Fore Street boasts a copper clad tower and stunning stonework, this is a town where it pays to look up and soak in the history.
Cornish Mine Images
Redruth Town 6 – Near the centre of Redruth, this old coaching inn once The King’s Arms, now houses a Building Society.
Cornish Mine Images
Redruth Town 7 – The impressive granite columns at the entrance to the boarded up London Inn.
Cornish Mine Images
Redruth Town 8 – The front of the London Inn, the building looks very impressive, in Redruth’s heyday of mining many owners and adventurers would have stayed here.
Cornish Mine Images
Redruth Town 9 – Good patterns and a dramatic sky, looking up in Redruth.
Cornish Mine Images
Redruth Town 10 – A narrow alley looking towards Fore Street, makes an interesting image.
Cornish Mine Images
Redruth Town 11 – The alleyway leading to Market Way Redruth, the old fashioned lamps and the gloom add to the atmosphere of the place.
Cornish Mine Images
Redruth Town 12 – The Redruth Mining Exchange, the building to the right was the old Post Office and the Bain and Field’s Bank.
The Mining Exchange is a Grade II listed building. It was constructed in 1880 at a cost of £500. It is thought to have been designed by local architect Sampson Hill. This is where the  local producers sold mineral stock.
Cornish Mine Images
Redruth Town 13 – The Mining exchange and its neighbours. On the left are also the old offices of Wheal Peevor Mine.
Cornish Mine Images
Redruth Town 14 – The Cornish Coat of Arms “One and All” can be seen on the central curved roof.
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Redruth Town 15 – A very ornate fine doorway next to the Redruth Mining Exchange.
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Redruth Town 16 – Opposite the station in Redruth are these ornate buildings. The one on the left is dated 1891, mining stocks and shares would have been traded here.
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Redruth Town 17 – A great frontal image of one of the offices.
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Redruth Town 18 – The same buildings from a slightly different angle. The building on the left was the registered offices of various Malaysian mining companies, it closed during the mid 1970’s.
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Redruth Town 19 – The roof line of the old offices is spectacular, great shapes and patterns for Black and White.
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Redruth Town 20 – This small building caught my eye, it made an interesting subject.
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Redruth Town 21 – The building from the other side, down the hill are the old Peevor Mine Offices.
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Redruth Town 22 – Caught by chance in Redruth, this dog looks so very comfortable hanging out of the window.
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Redruth Town 23 – One of the side streets in Redruth, the old two up two down cottages are typical of miners dwellings. In the background rising proudly is the stack of Pednandrea Mine which dominates the townscape.
This mine was already active in the early 18th century, and was operated intermittently until 1891.
The workings are located under Redruth town; the shafts are built over and most of the many small mines that were included in its sett cannot be identified today. The stepped chimney near Engine and Sump shafts, was erected during 1824.

During its last working period, from 1854 to 1891, the mine produced 1,090 tons of 5.5% copper ore, 7,700 tons of black tin, and, together with Wheal Sparnon, 974 tons of arsenic. It was by far the largest tin producer in the area.

Information from Mindat.org.
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Redruth Town 24 – A second image of the same street looking towards the chimney.
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Redruth Town 25 – Built during 1824, this is the stack of Pednandrea Mine which stands proudly above Redruth.
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Cornish Mine Images 26 – Up on the hill behind Pednandrea Mine I also found the remains of an old tramway, the granite setts can be seen clearly.
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Cornish Mine Images 27 – The entrance to the Druid’s Hall, built during 1859 it housed a library and large a assembly room upstairs. It was sadly destroyed by fire during the 1980’s.
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Cornish Mine Images 28 – An entrance at the rear to the Druid’s Hall, hidden inside is St Rumon’s Garden.
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Cornish Mine Images 29 – Without doubt the best print I have done for a while. One of the surviving Druid’s Hall twin windows, also the buildings in the background add an interesting perspective.
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Cornish Mine Images 30 – The same window from further back.
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Cornish Mine Images 31 – This is the house that belonged to William Murdoch, he worked with the engineers Boulton and Watt in 1779. The house is notable for being the first building in the world to be lit by gas lighting during 1792. In the foreground is the 14th Century St Rumon’s Cross.
For more information about William Murdock Click Here.
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Cornish Mine Images 32 – The whole of the courtyard with the cross in the foreground.
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Cornish Mine Images 33 – More ornate windows in the surviving front wall of the Druid’s Hall.
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Cornish Mine Images 34 – The old Reduth Fire Station built in 1913 also now a Grade 2 Listed Building. Once again stunning architecture and stonework make the building so special.
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Cornish Mine Images 35 – A closer look at the Fire Station Tower.
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Cornish Mine Images 36 – Another of the fire station from a different angle with the Redruth Viaduct standing behind. I believe there are plans to turn this wonderful building into a museum/art gallery.
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Cornish Mine Images 37 – Certainly my favorite image of the day, this collection of doorways at the top of Cross Street. It works so well in Black and White.
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Cornish Mine Images 38 – This amazing building is along Penryn Street, certainly the brickwork is very impressive.
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Cornish Mine Images 39 – Always remember to look up and appreciate the architecture.
Overlooking Redruth is Carn Brea which rises to 738 feet above sea level.
For More Information about Carn Brea Click Here.
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Cornish Mine Images 40 – This is Carn Brea Castle, originally it was built as a chapel dedicated to St. Michael, which was then incorporated into the Basset hunting lodge and given its castellated appearance. Lately restored and extended by local builder Percy Williams to serve as a restaurant. (Information supplied by Carn Brea Protection Group)
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Cornish Mine Images 41 – A second view of the Castle, also this one shows how it has been built into the rock.
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Cornish Mine Images 42 – A final image of Carn Brea Castle.
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Cornish Mine Images 43 – On top of Carn Brea is the Monument to Francis Basset, 1st Baron de Dunstanville and Basset (1757–1835).
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Cornish Mine Images 44 – A second image of the Carn Brea Monument. It was built in 1836 and is 90m high.
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Cornish Mine Images 45 – A view from the top of Carn Brea. In the centre of the image are the twin Engine Houses of Wheal Uny Mine.
I had such a great time trooping around Redruth and Camborne. However I was very happy to call it a day and head back for a pint and put down the camera bag.

For more information about Redruth follow the link: www.cornwalls.co.uk

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