St Ives Mining District

The mines of the St Ives Mining District have suffered over the years, there are now very few obvious remains left. Large scale mining here generally declined during the latter part of the nineteen century, due to the low Tin prices.

By 1890 all the mines had closed. In 1905 there was a slight resurgence when the price of Tin again rose, St Ives Consols and Giew Mines were the last to work. Giew was the final mine to close in 1922.

The mines of the St Ives Mining District were well known for huge underground ore bodies known as Carbonas. These were principally found in St Ives Consols and Rosewall Hill Mine, after they were mined out they remained as huge empty caverns. Sadly now silent and filled with dark water.

St Ives Mining District

St Ives Mining District 1: The Pumping Engine House of Giew Mine from the boiler house side. The shaft here is 225m deep and known as Frank’s Shaft. It is situated on the Western side of Trink Hill beside the B3311. The mine worked from 1838-1922 producing 145 tons of Tin. The engine house was conserved in 1994.

For more images of follow this Link: Giew Mine Gallery

St Ives Mining District

St Ives Mining District 2: One of my favorite places in the district. This image was taken standing on top of Rosewall Hill looking towards the sea. The second chimney in the background belonged to St Ives Wheal Allen, regrettably this collapsed in 2014/2015.

St Ives Mining District

St Ives Mining District 3: The two chimneys belong to Rosewall and Ransom United Mine, this worked from 1839-1876 producing 1,500 tons of Tin. The closer stack served the whim and the lower belonged to the pumping engine, the engine houses still survive but are covered in ivy and deep in the gorse.

St Ives Mining District

St Ives Mining District 4: The twin stacks from a slightly different angle, the town of St Ives is in the distance.

St Ives Mining District

St Ives Mining District 5: Looking up Rosewall Hill from the bottom. The two engine houses can still be seen in the undergrowth, the stacks are further up the hill. Now (2017) the engine houses are totally covered in vegetation.

St Ives Mining District

St Ives Mining District 6: Near the summit of Watchcroft is the remains of the Bob wall of Garden Mine, the walled shaft can be seen in front of the engine house.

St Ives Mining District

St Ives Mining District 7: At 700ft above sea level it is the highest mine in Cornwall.

St Ives Mining District

St Ives Mining District 8: The engine house is very exposed to the weather and it has suffered over the years. he mine worked from 1838-1870 producing only a few tons of Tin.

St Ives Mining District

St Ives Mining District 9: Located in Zennor near St Ives, Rosevale Mine is owned by the “Rosevale Historical Mining Society” who are a group of underground enthusiasts and ex-miners. They are dedicated to the restoration of the underground workings using traditional mining methods. Click the image to navigate to the page on this interesting mine.

For more images of follow this Link: Rosevale Mine

St Ives Mining District

St Ives Mining District 10: The scant remains of Gurnard’s Head Mine. This was a small Copper Mine which started before 1821. The workings here are said to go out under the sea.

St Ives Mining District

St Ives Mining District 11: The engine house is in a poor state of repair. The mine worked from 1821-1847 it produced only 25 tons of Copper.

St Ives Mining District

St Ives Mining District 12: These are the two surviving engine houses of Carn Galver Mine built in 1871. The mine closed in 1876 having produced 150 tons of Tin.

For more images follow this link: Carn Galver Mine Gallery

St Ives Mining District

St Ives Mining District 13: Known locally as Georgia Bal this is the all enclosed Engine House at Baker’s Pit a China Clay working near to Nancledra.

St Ives Mining District

St Ives Mining District 14: The interior of the Engine House that contained a 25″ Rotative Beam Engine. The house was built in 1874, the engine was brought from Treylon Consols near to St Ives.

St Ives Mining District

St Ives Mining District 15: A set of long unused steps behind the Engine House. The China Clay Pt is at the rear of the house and it closed in 1942. It is now run by the Cornwall Wildlife Trust.

St Ives Mining District

St Ives Mining District 16: This is the remaining chimney of the China Clay works near to the Engine House. It is very overgrown and difficult to photograph. It is a lovely chimney.

St Ives Mining District

St Ives Mining District 17: This is the small Pumping Engine House on Mushell’s Shaft of Wheal Kitty. Situated on the south side of Trink Hill.

St Ives Mining District

St Ives Mining District 18: The engine here was a 28″ that was put to work in 1864. This was part of the Wheal Sisters Group of Mines that was formed in 1875.

St Ives Mining District

St Ives Mining District 19:  Also part of the Wheal Sisters Group of Mines this is Trencrom Mine. This is the house of a 60″ pumping engine that was erected in 1871 on Mitchell’s Shaft.

St Ives Mining District

St Ives Mining District 20: When the mine had been included into Wheal Sisters in 1875 the engine was replaced by a 24″ Rotative Engine. This wound from Fox’s Shaft across the field.

St Ives Mining District

St Ives Mining District 21: A final image of the Trencrom Mine showing the sadly decayed stack.

The Wheal Sisters Group of Mines was among the most productive of the St Ives Mining District. Formed in 1875 by the merger of: Wheal Kitty, Wheal Margaret, Wheal Mary and Trencrom Mine.

The group worked from 1875 then closing in 1900, a brief re-working was attempted in 1906 but was soon abandoned. The mines of the group had a recorded output of 12,950 tons of Tin and 10,700 Tons of Copper, this is a total for the mines before and after merger.

St Austell Mining District

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