Geevor Mine Wethereds Shaft

Geevor Mine Wethereds Shaft is named after the company’s chairman at the time; Oliver Wethered.

Geevor Mine Wethered's Shaft
Geevor Mine Wethereds Shaft 1 – Firstly, Oliver Wethered was the chairman of North Levant and Geevor Co from 1906. Image reproduced here from www.gracesguide.co.uk.
Sinking commenced during 1910 from deep adit. Then in 1911 sinking from the surface was started with the intention of intersecting the new shaft which was achieved later that year. The shaft measures 14ft by 5ft 6” within the timbers, designed with three compartments two; for skips and one for a ladderway.
Equipped with self dumping skips hauled by an electric twin drum winder, these were used for manriding and the hoisting of ore.This was the main haulage shaft for Geevor Mine until 1919 when the increased development of the mine required a new shaft 1,700 ft to the west. This was subsequently named Victory in honour of the Allied success in the First World War.
The shaft continued to deepen until it reached a final depth of 800ft. During the 1930’s the site had become idle because Victory took over as the main access to the mine. In 1944 the shaft was decommissioned, however it was used as a secondary access until the mid 1950’s.
Geevor Mine Wethereds Shaft
Geevor Mine Wethereds Shaft 2 – An image of Wethered’s Shaft looking West taken during 1945.
Catalogue Number: P208011 Courtesy of the British Geological Survey
So, the headframe has been recently rebuilt (2002) after the original suffered storm damage. I was lucky enough to gain access to the winder house in 2016, my thanks go to Colin McClary for giving his time up to show us around.
Geevor Mine Wethereds Shaft
Geevor Mine Wethereds Shaft 3 – The wooden headframe as it is today.
Geevor Mine Wethereds Shaft
Geevor Mine Wethereds Shaft 4 – Another view oft he headframe over Wethered’s Shaft from the other side.
Geevor Mine Wethereds Shaft
Geevor Mine Wethereds Shaft 5 – The wooden Winder House, the headframe is in the background.
Geevor Mine Wethereds Shaft
Geevor Mine Wethereds Shaft 6 – A preserved set of Cornish Stamps powered by a waterwheel were moved here during the 1980’s as part of the original Geevor Museum. These have now been moved to the main site and have received a great deal of tender care to restore them.
Geevor Mine Wethereds Shaft
Geevor Mine Wethereds Shaft 7 – An image of the stamps head, these were in use processing waste dump material until 1954 at Trelocke Farm near Nancledra.
Geevor Mine Wethereds Shaft
Geevor Mine Wethereds Shaft 8 – The building on this part of the site are also very photogenic. These were part of the original museum. They date back to when the shaft was the main operating area of Geevor.
Geevor Mine Wethereds Shaft
Geevor Mine Wethereds Shaft 9 – The light was excellent and I think these images are very effective. So very typical of light in St Just when the cloud comes over.
The rest of the images are of the electric winder which was installed at the shaft in 1914. This building is not open to the public.
Geevor Mine Wethereds Shaft
Geevor Mine Wethereds Shaft 10 – One of the depth indicators for the electric winder.
Cornish Mine Images
Geevor Mine Wethereds Shaft 11 – A good view of the winder showing the twin depth indicators. This would suggest that both drums could be driven independent of each other.
Cornish Mine Images
Cornish Mine Images 12 – Each drum has its own braking system. The winder was capable of drawing 160 tons of ore per day, along with men and materials.
Cornish Mine Images
Cornish Mine Images 13 – The main drive from the motor showing the angled cogs that would lock into the other wheel. The double helical gears on the winder driving / driven gears are nothing what-so ever about reducing the chance of the teeth jumping out of gear. The staggered helical teeth give a much smoother transition of power transmission than straight cut spur gears. (Bob Orchard)
Cornish Mine Images
Cornish Mine Images 14 – The main drive wheel of the winder, amazing craftsmanship and engineering. It really was a thing of beauty.
Cornish Mine Images
Cornish Mine Images 15 – A close images of the cog teeth on the drive wheel.
Cornish Mine Images
Cornish Mine Images 16 – The 92 b.h.p electric motor and the operating handles for the driver.
Geevor Mine Wethereds Shaft
Cornish Mine Images 17 – The winder from the other side, it was all in very good condition. It was such a shame that it was shut up in here.
Geevor Mine Wethereds Shaft
Cornish Mine Images 18 – Finally a close up of the electric motor that powered the winder.

Follow this link to see the Geevor Mine website.

This is a lovely piece of mining history, hopefully it can be opened to the public in the future. This whole part of the site needs some work as the building there certainly deserve some preservation.

The Last Cornish Mines

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