Little Treviscoe

I was amazed walking around the village of Little Treviscoe. I could not believe how close the China Clay industry had encroached onto peoples lives and properties. So I thought I would include a page showing the industry current and disused around the village.

Little Treviscoe
Little Treviscoe 1 – The Treviscoe junction and rail loading area. This is currently disused, when in use processed China Clay would be loaded into wagons to be transported away to the coast for loading into transport ships.
Treviscoe Pit was known to have been working in the early 1800’s the railway line here served both the Parkandillack and Treviscoe Pits. Extraction of China Clay from Treviscoe was suspended around 2012. I have been told that wet mining was re-commenced in 2017, so the site is now classed as active.
Little Treviscoe
Little Treviscoe 2 – A closer view of the loading area, looking at the weeds on the track I would guess this has not been used for a while.
The village of Little Treviscoe is made up of around 30 houses and multiple Imerys offices. However the whole area is dwarfed by the Clay Driers, Processing Sheds, along with disused pits and railways.
Little Treviscoe
Little Treviscoe 3 – A final images of the railway terminal showing how close the houses of the village are to the industrial areas.
Little Treviscoe
Little Treviscoe 4 – The storage area where the dried China Clay would be held until it was loaded onto the wagons for transportation to the coast.
Little Treviscoe
Little Treviscoe 5 – Looking up the road towards the village. This is a railway bridge over the lines used to transport the processed clay. On the right is a group of settling tanks.
Cornish Mine Images
Little Treviscoe 6 – Settling tanks for the Clay Slurry are literally everywhere. The sheets around the tanks are to try to minimise the wind blowing dust around.
Cornish Mine Images
Little Treviscoe 7 – There is a huge processing area at Trevisco, much of it appears to be unused. This is a Thickening Settling Tank, from here the processed slurry would be pumped to the driers.
Cornish Mine Images
Little Treviscoe 8 – Another closer view of the Settling Tank. Here the larger and heavier sand and rock particles sink to the bottom where revolving blades scrape the bottom of the tank. The waste is pushed towards the centre where it is removed. The corrosive nature of the water can be seen by the damage in the spindle.
I do find it very difficult to stay out of the Clay Area. I have found it very interesting along with a great wealth of industrial photographs. During one of my visits in 2018 I once again found myself at Little Treviscoe. The day was perfect for photography so I made the most of it.
Little Treviscoe
Little Treviscoe 9 – Back once again to the rail terminus. I would love to get down there and have a proper look around.
Little Treviscoe
Little Treviscoe 10 – On the left are the storage sheds where the processed product would have been stored.
Little Treviscoe
Little Treviscoe 11 – Walking out of the village there is this large settling tank.
Little Treviscoe
Little Treviscoe 12 -Theses tanks can be huge, it is surronded by corregated iron to reduce the wind from blowing the product.
Little Treviscoe
Little Treviscoe 13 – Pipes and shadows make such an interesting photograph.
Little Treviscoe
Little Treviscoe 14 – The houses are so very close to the processing area.
Little Treviscoe
Little Treviscoe 15 – Another view of the houses in the village, the settling tank is on the right.
So I continued my walk out of the village. Soon more of the moonlike landscape could be seen. One of the entrances to Goonvean China Clay Pit is along the road, there were some good images to be had.
Cornish China Clay
Cornish China Clay 16 – This is the crossingpoint over the main road. On busy days there would be heavy machinery crossing here.
Cornish China Clay
Cornish China Clay 17 – During busy times this small hut would be manned, and a set of traffic lights controlled from here. Also the village can be seen in the background.
Cornish China Clay
Cornish China Clay 18 – Along the road was this abandoned building. The light was perfect for photography.
Once again I would have loved to have an explore. However all these sites are on Private Land and are restricted access. I headed back to the village.
Cornish China Clay
Cornish China Clay 19 – This is one of the many railway lines in the area. All these would have served the active Clay Pits.
Cornish China Clay
Cornish China Clay 20 – Near to the centre of the village was yet another setting tank.
Cornish China Clay
Cornish China Clay 21 – Along the side of the tank was a small pump house. From here the slurry would have been pumped into the tank.
Cornish China Clay
Cornish China Clay 22 – Another image of the small pump house.
Cornish China Clay
Cornish China Clay 23 – The village was so quiet. Sometimes you can forget that here you are surrounded by industry.
Cornish China Clay
Cornish China Clay 24 – Finally for this page, these are huge storage tanks where the clay slurry would have been stored.
No doubt I will be back soon.

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