Parkandillick Gallery 4

Parkandillick Gallery 4: This is the final page of the Parkandillick Engine House Galleries. The top floor of the house is home to the beam of the engine, this page looks at the Bob Loft.

Parkandillick Gallery 4

Parkandillick Gallery 4.1 – The indoor end of the cast iron beam and the parallel motion.

Parkandillick Gallery 4

Parkandillick Gallery 4.2 – Rough casting marks on the side of the beam.

Parkandillick Gallery 4

Parkandillick Gallery 4.3 – The main bearing for the beam, when in use the housing below would have been kept full of oil.

Parkandillick Gallery 4

Parkandillick Gallery 4.4 – The beam bearing the maker’s name: Sandys, Vivian of Copperhouse Foundry, Hayle.

Parkandillick Gallery 4

Parkandillick Gallery 4.5 – A clearer image of the makers name. Above the lettering (V)can be seen what are believed to be dog paw prints. The animal must have run across the sand mould before the beam was cast.

Parkandillick Gallery 4

Parkandillick Gallery 4.6 – A closeup of the indoor end of the beam, the precision of these engines has always fascinated me.

Parkandillick Gallery 4

Parkandillick Gallery 4.7 – This is the hand windlass and attached chain at the indoor end of the beam.

Parkandillick Gallery 4

Parkandillick Gallery 4.8 – A closer image of the windlass clearly showing the locking teeth closest to the camera.

Parkandillick Gallery 4

Parkandillick Gallery 4.9 – A final image of the windlass this would have been used for lifting heavy machinery during repairs and maintenance,m also when the engine was mothballed it would be set to take a proportion of the weight of the heavy beam.

Parkandillick Gallery 4

Parkandillck Gallery 4.10 – The final image on this group of pages about this wonderful engine house. This image is looking back at the timber clad bob loft, from the end of bob platform.

My thanks go to The Trevithick Society for letting me use their material about the Parkandillack Engine on these gallery pages.
The site is owned by Imerys on private land, entry is controlled and should not be attempted without the proper permissions.
At present, there is a push towards better access to enable a small team to carry out urgent repairs on the Grade II listed engine house and maintain the engine and hopefully, the winders next door. The roof is the big worry, many of the barge boards were in a sad state, as soon as the weather gets into the wood work it would not take long for the building to deteriorate quickly which would be a tragic loss.

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