Parkandillick Gallery 2

Parkandillick Gallery 2, the images on this page are of the Boiler House also the Clay Winder House. It has to be said it was an amazing time spent there.

But I must arrange to go back sometime to get more images of the outside. Sadly the film with the most exterior images did not develop correctly.
Parkandillick Gallery 2.1
Parkandillick Gallery 2.1 – Firstly this is the Lancashire boiler in the well preserved boiler house. This was such a sight to see, the floor was covered with thick mud indicating the house had flooded at some point.
Parkandillick Gallery 2.2
Parkandillick Gallery 2.2 – The boiler house from ground level. The boiler is now an air container, used to store compressed air to operate the engine. So incredible that it has survived in this state. It is certainly unique.

 

Parkandillick Gallery 2.3
Parkandillick Gallery 2.3 – On the wall is part of the Boiler feed pump. This would continually pump water into the high pressure boiler.
Parkandillick Gallery 2.4
Parkandillick Gallery 2.4 – The front face of the twin flue Lancashire boiler. Incredibly it still appears to be still full of ash from the last time it was fired. Made by: H. and T. Danks Netherton Ltd, near Dudley, Birmingham.
Parkandillick Gallery 2
One of the adverts for a Lancashire boiler from H. & T. Danks. Image re-produced here from www.gracesguide.co.uk.
Parkandillick Gallery 2
Parkandillick Gallery 2.5 – These are the twin water gauges mounted on the front of the Lancashire boiler to monitor the level of water. Great to see them still intact.
Parkandillick Gallery 2
Parkandillick Gallery 2.6 – The area above the boiler, this is part of the two stage centrifugal fan used to demonstrate the engine. It delivers 700 cu. ft. of air per minute. Sadly we did not get to see the engine run, I believe it is only done once or twice a year.
These remaining images were taken in the “Winding House” which is joined via a small doorway. This room contains the small twin cylinder winding engine.
Parkandillick Gallery 2
Parkandillick Gallery 2.7 – The first view into the winder house. At the rear of the building is a “railway style” stationary boiler. In the foreground is the top of the winding engine.
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Parkandillick Gallery 2.8 – Another image of the stationary boiler. It must have been moved in here in an effort to preserve it.
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Parkandillick Gallery 2.9 – So, this is the preserved clay winder. Steam was supplied from the main boiler by the pipe coming through the wall above the door.
This hauled rail-mounted skips up two inclines to form the conical waste ‘sky tips’ once typical of the area. This was done by means of two winding drums, individually dog clutched to the drive shaft.
Parkandillick Gallery 2
Parkandillick Gallery 2.10 – The twin drums and operating handles of the winder.
Either drum could hoist a loaded skip, which ran back empty into the pit under gravity, controlled by the drum brake. Also chain driven dials, known as ‘miniatures’, would indicate the skip positions.
Parkandillick Gallery 2
Parkandillick Gallery 2.11 – Another view of the twin drums. Also one of the circular skip position indicators can be seen on the right.
The engine and drums were not designed as a unit, the drive being a local adaptation. The engine is a twin simple with cylinders of 12” bore and 14” stroke. It is of the ‘colonial’ type, which splits down into units. So it is suitable for conveyance by pack animals into remote areas.
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Parkandillick Gallery 2.12 – The winder from the front.
Parkandillick Gallery 2
Cornish Mine Images 2.13 – The steam regulator handle to control the speed of the winding engine. Such a wonderful piece of mechanical history.
Exhaust steam was led to a heat exchanger in the Cornish engine’s cataract chamber to preheat the feed water to the boiler, and hence to atmosphere.
(Courtesy of The Trevithick Society)
Parkandillick Gallery 2
Cornish Mine Images 2.14 – These are the cylinders and cams of the winding engine.
Cornish Mine Images
Cornish Mine Images 2.15 – This is the end of the twin cylinders of the winding engine.
Cornish Mine Images
Cornish Mine Images 2.16 – Another boiler that is stored in the winding house.
Cornish Mine Images
Cornish Mine Images 2.17 – A closeup of the single water gauge on this boiler. I would be most interested to know where and how this was used.
Cornish Mine Images
Cornish Mine Images 2.18 – The the front of the stationary railway type boiler. Also with the glass water gauges intact. Made by William Foster and Co of Wellington Foundry, Lincoln.
Cornish Mine Images
One of the adverts WM Foster and Co Ltd, the drawing is almost identical to the boiler in the winding house. Image re-produced here from www.gracesguide.co.uk.
Cornish Mine Images
Cornish Mine Images 2.19 – So mounted on the wall is a code of signals for the winder driver. Also a real piece of history. The initials stand for: English Clays, Lovering, Pochin, & Co Ltd.
Cornish Mine Images
Cornish Mine Images 2.20 – Another closer image of the code of signals, dated November 1956.

Parkandillick Engine House Gallery 3

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